Marianne Mader

PhD Student, Planetary Science

Marianne Mader

Expertise: Geology
Affiliation: Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration, University of Western Ontario
Certification/Education:
M.Sc. - Space Studies, International Space University, Strasbourg, France
M.Sc. - Earth Science, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
B.Sc. – Earth Science, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

Marianne specializes in geological mapping of remote field areas. Her research is focused on developing lunar exploration strategies, specifically for geological work, using terrestrial analogue missions. She received her bachelor’s degree in Earth Science at the University of New Brunswick and worked with the Geological Survey of Canada during the summer months in northern Ontario. As part of her MSc in Earth Science, Marianne completed two summer field seasons in SW Greenland and developed a new tectonic model for a 3 billion-year-old greenstone belt near Nuuk, the capital city. Subsequently, Marianne obtained an MSc in Space Studies from the International Space University, France which opened her eyes to the field of planetary exploration. Through the internship component of this program she worked at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and participated in the 2007 Haughton-Mars Project, Devon Island. Further work at the CSA as a Research Affiliate involved field investigations of a lunar and mars analogue sites, ranging from the Yukon to northern Axel Heiberg Island, Canadian high Arctic.

As a PhD student at the University of Western Ontario (UWO), Marianne has continued her research of planetary analogue sites on Earth. She is presently part of UWO-lead lunar analogue missions at the Mistastin Lake impact structure in Labrador, Canada. She is studying the design and effective evaluation of analogue missions, in order to help develop future planetary missions. As part of the Pavilion Lake Research Team Marianne aims to help with the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the relationship between scientific productivity and operational procedures and constraints.